Why Trees Are So Important

In my design work, and in my own life in general, trees play a very important role. Most people are of course well aware of the role trees play on our planet in regards to the carbon cycle. But have you really considered all the many ways in which trees improve our environment and makeContinue reading “Why Trees Are So Important”

Permaculture Zoning Outside and in the Home

Permaculture designs often focus on time, and how frequently the humans of the system will visit the various elements and areas of it. Zone one is used designated to the most frequently visited places. Somewhat less frequently visited areas are zone two. After which there may be further zones, radiating out the wild zones outwithContinue reading “Permaculture Zoning Outside and in the Home”

Applications for Permaculture: Sectors and Flow

In permaculture, when we talk about sectors what we are essentially considering is how energy will enter and move through the space. We should consider the sun, the wind, water, and also human energy, and the paths we take as we move around. How sun, wind and water etc. behave on the site will setContinue reading “Applications for Permaculture: Sectors and Flow”

Forest Garden Tips

If you are familiar with my work, you will no doubt have noticed that I am passionate about forest gardens. This form of food production can provide generous yields for remarkably little effort once established. And of course there are many other benefits to forest gardening too – for our households, communities and the widerContinue reading “Forest Garden Tips”

Case Study: California Permaculture Design

This permaculture plan is for a property located in North Ridge in the San Fernando Valley, LA. The goal was to create a sleek and modern garden which could also provide plenty of edible produce without requiring excessive amounts of gardening work. The Site The garden is broadly typical for the area and climate zone.Continue reading “Case Study: California Permaculture Design”

Getting Started With ‘No Dig’ Gardening

No dig gardening starts with a single simple idea: we need to protect the soil in our gardens. Soil health is essential for good plant growth, and as with so many things in sustainability, what you don’t do is as important as what you do. In a no dig garden, the general rule is, asContinue reading “Getting Started With ‘No Dig’ Gardening”

No Such Thing as ‘Too Many’ When It Comes To Garden Crops

I can’t tell you how many times I have heard gardeners complain that they have ‘too many courgettes’ to get through. Or that they have too much lettuce… But as permaculture gardeners and growers know, excess abundance should not be viewed as a negative. Successional sowing and careful planning can help to spread out harvestsContinue reading “No Such Thing as ‘Too Many’ When It Comes To Garden Crops”

Growing Year Round – Not Just in Summer

Many gardeners begin by sowing seeds in spring and tending crops to harvest towards the end of the main growing season. But to really boost productivity and self-reliance in a permaculture garden, it is useful to think about how, in a temperate climate, we can extend the growing season. When we provide plants with someContinue reading “Growing Year Round – Not Just in Summer”

Case Study: Indianapolis Permaculture Design

The plan above is for a large domestic garden in Indianapolis. According to permaculture principles, it has been designed with the site and location in mind. Site The design of course takes into account the local climate and conditions, and the soil of the area, which is typically in the inceptisols order, and the SycamoreContinue reading “Case Study: Indianapolis Permaculture Design”

Increasing Yield in Any Garden

In permaculture gardens, one of our key goals is to obtain a yield. The higher the yield, the more productive, resilient and sustainable our gardens can be. Yield is theoretically unlimited… I recently wrote a short e-book for a client on how to increase yield in a polytunnel garden: How to Increase Yield: (without gettingContinue reading “Increasing Yield in Any Garden”