Reasons to Dig in a ‘No Dig’ Garden

I’ve already spoken before on this site about the concept of a ‘no dig’ garden. In a no dig garden, the key is to create and manage growing areas so that we disturb the soil ecosystem as little as possible (and take steps to improve it). This involves strategies like making lasagna gardens, hugelkultur moundsContinue reading “Reasons to Dig in a ‘No Dig’ Garden”

Case Study: Terraced Site

This plan is for a domestic property in Port Townsend, Washington.  The Site The property is in USDA planting zone 8b. The frost-free period is typically 225-250 days. The area typically has lower precipitation than is usual for the state. There are typically around 21 inches per year of rainfall, and 2.1 inches of snow.Continue reading “Case Study: Terraced Site”

Managing Water Flow in Permaculture Design

In permaculture, one of the basic design principles is use and value renewable resources. One of the most vital natural resources we have is fresh water. Permaculture approaches to all facets of life must take into account the pathways of fresh water. Those designing sustainable landscapes and food producing systems must think about how freshContinue reading “Managing Water Flow in Permaculture Design”

Catch and Store Rainwater in Your Garden

Fresh water is an important resource. And even in areas where there is quite a lot of it around, it pays to use it wisely. Learning how to catch and store rainwater in your garden is an important step in permaculture practice. How To Catch Rainwater Connect rainwater from the roof of your home. AndContinue reading “Catch and Store Rainwater in Your Garden”