Case Study: Sloping Garden Design

This is a design for a sloping back garden in northern England. The site slopes steeply down from north to south, from the back of the home to the lower end. There is around 2.2m difference in elevation between the highest point outside the back door, to the lowest point close to the end of the garden.

There is currently a small concrete patio that is in poor repair, and which the current owners really dislike, to the north of the site. The rest of the garden slopes steeply down, mostly laid to lawn but little used. And the lowest end floods sometimes in heavy rains.

The client was keen to create a space where she and her family could spend time outdoors and make the most of the space. But she also wanted to make sure that they could grow some food perennially, and also care for and attract local wildlife.

The client had already decided that they would like a wood deck outside the back door, to use for outdoor kitchen/ dining/ lounge space. A raised bed around the edge of this space will be planted with a mix of annual veg., herbs and flowers.

Steps will lead down from this decking to a second tier, where the client’s teenaged kids can enjoy a fire pit and spending time with friends. Sloped banks will be planted up diversely with intermingled edibles and ornamental planting.

On the next terrace, between two stone walls, a path will wind through a small and multi-layered forest garden. Then further steps will lead down to a tranquil deck on the side of a natural pond, set amid lush and shade tolerant planting. A path will also lead to a secluded seat for summer reading in this quiet and secluded part of the garden.

Terracing this tricky sloping site, and making the most of boggy and shaded areas at the lowest level, means that the family will be able to actually make full use of what is currently a very under-utilised space.

If you would like some help to make the most of your own garden, please do get in touch.

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